Biermuncher's Centennial Blonde - All-Grain Recipe Kit Biermuncher's Centennial Blonde - All-Grain Recipe Kit Taking 1st place in Homebrew Talk's Top 100 Recipes is Biermuncher with a Centennial Blonde Ale. Biermuncher describes this beer as "Light and crisp, the IBU’s are on the low side, but there is a nice sweet/spicy balance to the beer. The great fresh taste of a craft ale with an extremely clean finish." Read more below for a brief interview over this award winning homebrew!

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Centennial Blonde - All-Grain Recipe Kit
REC-KT-AG-HBS-HBT1 23 23

Biermuncher's Centennial Blonde - All-Grain Recipe Kit

REC-KT-AG-HBS-HBT1
$23.00

Availability: Out of stock

$23.00

Price as configured: $23.00

Taking 1st place in Homebrew Talk's Top 100 Recipes is Biermuncher with a Centennial Blonde Ale. Biermuncher describes this beer as "Light and crisp, the IBU’s are on the low side, but there is a nice sweet/spicy balance to the beer. The great fresh taste of a craft ale with an extremely clean finish." Read more below for a brief interview over this award winning homebrew!

All orders containing Liquid Yeast will be shipped with a complimentary ice pack to ensure safe shipping!

Centennial Blonde - All-Grain Recipe Kit



General Info:

    • Batch Size: 5 Gallons
    • Mash at 150 degrees
    • Est. Original Gravity: 1.040 SG
    • Est. Final Gravity: 1.008 SG
    • Est. Alcohol by Volume: 4%
    • Bitterness: 21.5 IBUs
    • Est. Color: 3.9 SRM
    • Ferment at 68 Degrees
  • Pale Malt
  • Cara-Pils
  • Crystal 10L
  • Vienna Malt

  • Centennial
  • Cascade
Centennial Blonde Interview with Biermuncher

Question #1. How did you start brewing?

Answer: It started with the perennially popular “Mr. Beer Kit” my wife bought me for Christmas in 2006. The resulting batch was predictably yeasty and tangy, but something about this gimmicky brew kit sparked in me a deeper interest. I’d brewed a couple batches about 15 years earlier using a more conventional bucket setup, but the lack of ingredients at that time left me with disappointing beers and after just a couple of batches, I stowed the equipment away in my basement. Maybe it was the magic of listening to the yeast churn away in the Mr. Beer fermenter. Maybe it was the bready smell coming from the airlock. Maybe it was just the idea that I was making my own beer. Of course it could have been that I was just deathly bored in the middle of the winter. Whatever the reason, before the Mr. Beer batch was more than 3 days old, I dug out the old equipment, ran to the local Homebrew Shop to buy whatever pieces of equipment I was missing, and was heading home with a recommended recipe kit. My original brewing equipment was back at work. No sooner had I pitched the yeast in this new batch of beer, than I was running back to the LHBS and buying more buckets, more ingredients and working my way through a LOT of Sam Adams to procure the cherished empty bottles. That winter, I brewed 8 consecutive weekends. By the 4th batch, I was into all grain. When I wasn’t brewing, I was scavenging for materials and building my own brewing equipment. I was hooked.  

Question #2. When in your homebrewing career did you make your first beer that you considered more than just “good”?

Answer: It was maybe my third or fourth all grain batch. I was trying to dial in a good Blue Moon clone. Keep in mind, this was 2007 so all of the spiced wit bier offshoots like Shocktop were still a thing of the future. Once I dropped in that strainer bag of crushed coriander and shredded orange peel into my keggle, the brew shop smelled amazing. I knew this was going to be a good one. I was still doing five gallon batches back then, and I was force carbing (using the shake method) my beers because I was impatient and my kegerator was still new. Sharing with family and friends who stopped by, that beer didn’t last more than a week and THAT is when I knew my homebrewed beer could be every bit as good as anything bought off the shelf or drawn into a pint glass.  

Question 3. What would be the best advice you could give someone that just started homebrewing?  

Answer: BREW…JUST BREW ALREADY! I have friends that say they want to get into home brewing and after more than a year of reading, lurking on HBT, asking me questions and wandering around the LHBS for hours on end…they are nowhere nearer to having their first batch brewed than when they started. When I decided I wanted to try brewing, I jumped in the car, drove to the local shop, took the owners recommendations and by that evening I had a fermenter bubbling away in the basement. Two days later, I went and bought three more fermenters and more raw materials and got my next batches going. I learned more about brewing in the 2 ½ hours of my first extract batch than any book could have told me. So advice to someone who wants to brew and keep on improving their product…buy your stuff and fire up the burner. Get your brew on already!

Question #4. Is this beer the best you have made so far, or are there others that we have yet to see?  

Answer: The Centennial Blonde has probably been brewed a thousand times by hundreds of brewers and while it is certainly the most popular of my recipes, I don’t think it’s my best. I’ve published more than my fair share of other recipes that have garnered accolades and awards. My Pales, IPA’s, IIPA’s, English Milds and smoked porters have all received some “bling” over the years, but the Centennial Blonde is the most popular because it bridges the gap between craft beer snobbery and BMC mass appeal. I’ve heard from a lot of brewers that this was their first all grain recipe and that it absolutely blew their friends away that they could brew something so different…but so drinkable.  

Question #5. Making a beer worthy of this list can’t be an easy task, what kind of process and thought went into a homebrew like this?  

Answer: Like I said when I published this recipe 8 year ago, I simply wanted to come up with a homebrew recipe that would satisfy someone wanting to brew a craft beer at home, but would still appeal to people who thought Guinness was a “heavy black beer”. Like most of my finished recipes, it was trial and error. Too much Centennial and the harshness lingered too long. Too much Cascade and the citrus as overpowering. Too much Crystal #40 and the color was too dark and flavor too malty. It was also just happenstance that I was well stocked on Centennial and Cascade hops. This was pre-2008 hops shortage after all. So in the case of the Centennial Blonde, it was probably 30% forethought and 70% trial and error and luck combined. I never went into this intending to create a top homebrewed recipe around the world. I just wanted to brew something I liked…was easy to brew…and might get people to try homebrew that didn’t look like liquid caramel in a glass. Somehow the recipe took on a life of its own and became a “go to” for people taking their first crack at making their own beer. The most rewarding part for me is that the recipe and the discussion around it might have helped convince people to pull that trigger and fire up their stove for their first homebrew.

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