• How to Repair & Fix a Ball Lock Keg

    Kegs can be a real pleasure to use. I can package fifteen gallons of beer in about an hour these days, my carbonation is always what I expect, and having draft beer always on hand adds an extra cool factor to gatherings at my house. I don’t have to store, clean, and de-label hundreds of bottles, and I never, ever worry about bottle bombs. But kegs do have their little foibles, and knowing how to really work with them will im...

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  • Getting to the Root of Homebrewed Root Beer

    I don’t have to tell you about the stunningly wide variety of beers you can create at home. You’re here on Homebrew Supply, after all. You already know. But what about root beer? It has “beer” in its name, but we don’t often think about it in homebrewing discussions. After all, most of us don’t think about it as “beer” at all, since it’s most widely consumed as a non-alcoholic soda beverage. A Bit of History ...

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  • All Grain Brew Day: Crush to Pitch

    OK, so you want to try all grain. But what goes into an all grain brew day? There are two basic methods of mashing grain, with branches off of those. Using a mash tun or using the Brew-In-A-Bag (BIAB) method. I’m going to focus on the more traditional mash tun, but rest assured that BIAB will produce equally excellent all-grain beer as well. Make Sure Everything Is Accounted For Figure out what beer you want to brew, then ma...

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  • Brewing Malt Comparison Chart

    There are so many types of brewing malt available to us homebrewers that making a unique recipe actually isn't that hard despite there being over 4,000 breweries in the United States alone. The table below is a list of each arranged by Lovibond (color). Show the Base Malts only Show the Steeping malts only Grains Arranged By Lovibond Value Name Potential SRM Mash Required? Max Grain Bill % Flavors & Characteristics Sub...

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  • Common Wine Faults and How to Detect Them

    There are several common wine faults in wine such as oxidization, Volatile Acidity and Brettanomyces infection, which can be easily identified when you know what to look for. Below we will run over some of the common wine faults and how to identify them. Oxidization This is one of the most common wine faults and will occur, generally, in older wines. It is a result of too much exposure with oxygen. Whites are most susceptible ...

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  • Barleywine Basics and A Recipe

    Featured Product Barleywine Recipe Kit Our American Barleywine is a big, bold, and strong version of the American classic. Complex in flavor and aroma, this sipper only gets better with age. $55.95 Order Now The term Barleywine (also known as “Barley Wine” in the U.K.) is somewhat of a misnomer. Containing no fruit, it is actually a very strong all-barley beer. Ranging in strength from 8% ABV to as high as 25%...

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  • 12 Tips to Making Amazing Session Beers

    Beer enthusiasts seek out and enjoy a lot of stronger styles, and with good reason. The richness, complexity, and depth of flavor we find in a stronger beer like a DIPA, an Imperial Stout, or a Wee Heavy just can’t be beat. The market keeps fulfilling the demand for these beers, and homebrewers make their own on top of that. But we can’t always drink big beers, no matter how much we want to. Sometimes, we want to have a fe...

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  • Secrets to Bottling Your Wine

    So you've patiently waited for your wine to be finished, and now you're ready to bottle your wine. But how do you bottle your wine? It's a simple process, but just like before, you need to be careful not to introduce spoilage factors or too much oxygen in doing so. First Thing's First, Preparation Wine: First you want to assure that your wine is fully fermented and stable (completely finished fermenting), fined for heat and co...

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  • Cold Soaking in Wine Making

    On the back label of many Pinot Noirs we see the term “Cold Soak” listed as part of the winemaking process. If you make your way into a tasting room in the Sonoma Valley of California or the Willamette Valley of Oregon, you may have a winemaker or tasting room host divulge in a very quick succession of words that the wine in your glass was cold soaked for 3 days, for example. In California, we almost expect to see most mid...

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