Beer Brewing Articles

  • RIMS and HERMS Systems: explained and compared

    Homebrewers love acronyms, but sometimes these timesaving abbreviations can overwhelm someone new to homebrewing or one looking to make changes in their homebrewing techniques. Two of these acronyms are RIMS and HERMS, which are made even more complicated because they are not completely clear even after you know their meaning! These two terms are closely related processes, so let’s tackle them together.   Featured Pro...

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  • Comparing All-in-One Electric Brewing Systems

    With multiple choices of solid all-in-one brewings systems on the market, a lot of people are choosing these as their option when making the jump to all-grain brewing, and for good reason. They are compact and easy to store, making them an excellent choice for people with limited space. Most of them are electric, so you can easily brew indoor and avoid harsh weather conditions. They are reliable systems with a fair amount of a...

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  • Intro to reverse osmosis and brewing better beer

    Beer is traditionally made from four ingredients- malt, hops, yeast, and water.   While we all pay careful attention to our malt choices, the character of the hops, and selection of yeast- but don’t often consider the water.   Since beer is 90% water, it is a crucial ingredient in brewing. If your tap water is full of chlorine, alkaline (leaving scale on the fixtures), has an odor, or you don’t know what is in it, purc...

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  • 12 Tips to Making Amazing Session Beers

    Beer enthusiasts seek out and enjoy a lot of stronger styles, and with good reason. The richness, complexity, and depth of flavor we find in a stronger beer like a DIPA, an Imperial Stout, or a Wee Heavy just can’t be beat. The market keeps fulfilling the demand for these beers, and homebrewers make their own on top of that. But we can’t always drink big beers, no matter how much we want to. Sometimes, we want to have a fe...

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  • All Grain Brew Day: Crush to Pitch

    OK, so you want to try all grain. But what goes into an all grain brew day? There are two basic methods of mashing grain, with branches off of those. Using a mash tun or using the Brew-In-A-Bag (BIAB) method. I’m going to focus on the more traditional mash tun, but rest assured that BIAB will produce equally excellent all-grain beer as well. Make Sure Everything Is Accounted For Figure out what beer you want to brew, then ma...

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  • Maintaining Mash Temperature

    When I did my first all-grain batch, I had no end of issues with keeping the mash temperature where I wanted it. It seemed simply impossible to get it even close to stable for a whole hour; I’d overshoot, then see the temperature drop too far, and I was always correcting by adding boiling or cold water. I had a few batches there where the results were just completely unpredictable, and it caused me a lot of frustration until...

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  • Quick Hits: Homebrewing Questions Answered 04

    Featured Product Recipe Kits Extract brewing cuts down the time it takes to finish a batch down considerable, allowing the brewer to skip the "mashing" process altogether and go straight to the boil. It also requiring less equipment than all-grain brewing. $25.95 - 72.95 Order Now In the last Quick Hits, we answered homebrewing questions about yeast, dunk sparging, and oxygenation issues. We're going to continue the yeast ...

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  • How Common Are Bugs in Craft Beer?

    Did you know there are roughly 10 Quintilian insects alive at any given time on the planet? That's a lot of bugs. Thankfully the FDA won't let any sort of insect infestations find their way into our craft beer right? Wrong. In fact, if you just opened up a beer, I'd bet my mortgage that you're drinking bugs along with it! A Bit of Interesting History On Bugs and Beer Brewing We know that yeast is one of the most resilient org...

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  • Creating Consistently Successful Kettle Sours

    Featured Product Lactobacillus Wyeast Lactobacillus 5335 is found in a lot of different beers including lambics, sour brown ales, gueuze, and Berliner Weisse. You'll always use in conjunction with S. cerevisae and often a variety of different wild yeasts. We recommend using in your beer or wort below 10 IBUs due to it's sensitivity to hop compounds. $13.95 Order Now Souring beers is an ancient practice that has been around...

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