• Creating Consistently Successful Kettle Sours

    Featured Product Lactobacillus Wyeast Lactobacillus 5335 is found in a lot of different beers including lambics, sour brown ales, gueuze, and Berliner Weisse. You'll always use in conjunction with S. cerevisae and often a variety of different wild yeasts. We recommend using in your beer or wort below 10 IBUs due to it's sensitivity to hop compounds. $13.95 Order Now Souring beers is an ancient practice that has been around...

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  • Getting to the Root of Homebrewed Root Beer

    I don’t have to tell you about the stunningly wide variety of beers you can create at home. You’re here on Homebrew Supply, after all. You already know. But what about root beer? It has “beer” in its name, but we don’t often think about it in homebrewing discussions. After all, most of us don’t think about it as “beer” at all, since it’s most widely consumed as a non-alcoholic soda beverage. A Bit of History ...

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  • Brewing Malt Comparison Chart

    There are so many types of brewing malt available to us homebrewers that making a unique recipe actually isn't that hard despite there being over 4,000 breweries in the United States alone. The table below is a list of each arranged by Lovibond (color). Show the Base Malts only Show the Steeping malts only Grains Arranged By Lovibond Value Name Potential SRM Mash Required? Max Grain Bill % Flavors & Characteristics Sub...

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  • Common Wine Faults and How to Detect Them

    There are several common wine faults in wine such as oxidization, Volatile Acidity and Brettanomyces infection, which can be easily identified when you know what to look for. Below we will run over some of the common wine faults and how to identify them. Oxidization This is one of the most common wine faults and will occur, generally, in older wines. It is a result of too much exposure with oxygen. Whites are most susceptible ...

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  • Barleywine Basics and A Recipe

    Featured Product Barleywine Recipe Kit Our American Barleywine is a big, bold, and strong version of the American classic. Complex in flavor and aroma, this sipper only gets better with age. $55.95 Order Now The term Barleywine (also known as “Barley Wine” in the U.K.) is somewhat of a misnomer. Containing no fruit, it is actually a very strong all-barley beer. Ranging in strength from 8% ABV to as high as 25%...

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  • Secrets to Bottling Your Wine

    So you've patiently waited for your wine to be finished, and now you're ready to bottle your wine. But how do you bottle your wine? It's a simple process, but just like before, you need to be careful not to introduce spoilage factors or too much oxygen in doing so. First Thing's First, Preparation Wine: First you want to assure that your wine is fully fermented and stable (completely finished fermenting), fined for heat and co...

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  • Cold Soaking in Wine Making

    On the back label of many Pinot Noirs we see the term “Cold Soak” listed as part of the winemaking process. If you make your way into a tasting room in the Sonoma Valley of California or the Willamette Valley of Oregon, you may have a winemaker or tasting room host divulge in a very quick succession of words that the wine in your glass was cold soaked for 3 days, for example. In California, we almost expect to see most mid...

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  • Cringe-Worthy Grain Crushing Methods Put to the Test

    The purpose of grain crushing is to crack open the outer husk of the grain, exposing the rich center. Well-milled grain will leave the husk in tact, like the opening of a clam. This will make the grain bed more coarse in the fermenter or grain bag, which will allow the water to pass through and remove the nutrients you need from within. If the grain isn’t cracked open, you won’t get all the good stuff in for your boil. If ...

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  • Quick Hits 03: Homebrewing Questions Answered

    In the last Quick Hits, we answered homebrewing questions about hops and hop spiders, secondaries, head retention, and more. This time around we're answering homebrewing questions regarding yeast, oxidation, dunk sparging, and more; • What's so Great About Liquid Yeast? • How Long Does Saved Yeast Last? • Problems Caused by High Fermentation Temperature • What is a Dunk Sparge? • Preventing Oxygen Exposure at B...

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